Thursday, May 21, 2015

Quoteism

Behind every strong exterior is an insecurity filled interior.
Not everyone can see, not everyone deserves to see.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

India does not deserve my vote



After Wednesday's 'incident' of a farmer committing suicide at the AAP rally, and the blame game that began, it's become clearer now more than ever that value of life in India matters little to none. It's worth gets reduced even further when put in the hands of the politicians.

Every four years, I enter a polling booth to cast my vote and pick one of the parties to lead my state/country. This choice is made entirely on the basis of my expectations of them and how much their public view points tally with mine. So basically I cast my vote in hope of seeing my life improve. To see the standard of living improve, education, services, and probably above everything - the society.

But what is the point of voting and expecting improvement in one's life when there is no life to speak of?

Now that man may have been a farmer or may not have been a farmer (as has been claimed) but the whole episode just reeks of complete disregard for human life. But what cannot be ignored is that a person lost his life for whatever reason - political or not.

We've become used to hearing old time stalwarts in BJP and Congress say utmost insensitive crap in the name of getting a few votes. Examples from this episode starting with Congress' Rahul Gandhi:

It is a very sad time. I just want to tell the farmers and labourers not to worry. We will help them… I had earlier said that the farmers are being punished by the Modi government. I had said that they only help industrialists. This is causing tremendous pain to the farmers of the country. This is sad. But we will do whatever we can for the farmers. We are going to fight the land ordinance.

And BJP wasn't too far away either with BJP spokesperson Sambit Patra quick to call a press conference after the farmer's death:

The whole thing was recorded by the media, but no leader from AAP got down from the stage. The speeches continued.

But when Delhites voted AAP in, in hope of seeing Arvind Kejriwal and his group become more sensitive to the people and be 'different', they became all the same. They, too, started to play the blame game and deflect from taking responsibility while someone died not more than 100 metres from the stage. Kejriwal said this immediately afterwards:

What upsets me most is that we kept asking the police to act, but they did nothing. We know that the Delhi Police is not in our control. But you must have some humanity. You must at least be under God’s control. The first thing I and Manish Sisodia will do is to go to the hospital.

 Another AAP member Ashutosh went one better with this sarcastic jibe during a TV 'debate':

This was Arvind Kejriwal's mistake. He should have got down from the stage. He made a mistake. Next time I will tell Kejriwal to get down and climb the tree and save people.


To make matters worse, or waters dirtier, there are multiple images and videos of the person on the tree and even pictures snapped when he fell to his death. The media plays holier than thou attitude but in being mere bystanders and not doing anything to aid that man, they're equally guilty for his death.

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Quoteism - 2

Keeping with the previous Quoteism, here is another.
Scepticism and pessimism, and not optimism, keeps one close to realism.

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Views on 'India's Daughter' documentary

Just finished watching the BBC documentary ‘India’s Daughter’. Observations (and some opinions):

  • Bold, powerful and thought provoking. Covers all angles that a documentary should - rapists/convicted, law makers, psychiatrists, members of the society and friends/family of those associated. 
  • My understanding of why the Information & Broadcasting Ministry had a ban on Indian airing is because of the rapists brazen comments in reference to women, rape and criminal activities. Reason why it escalated is because there is no sense of remorse whatsoever which is disappointing, shocking and unnerving.
  • Further problems added by the defence lawyers who in a way justify the act with their comments. While I would say that it is their job to say such things in order to keep the case alive as it is still undergoing after appeal. Their statements reek of disrespect towards women and highlight that they find men superior than women.
  • It is worth noting that the police and/or the government tried their very best to prevent the movement and the agitation after the brutal rape. This raises questions of how independent we really are.
  • Chance now for the new government - both at the centre and at the state - to make a change. If they really want to that is without this greed for votes blinding them.
  • Lastly, as mentioned in the documentary, the solution isn’t just in the hanging of four or five rapists, or of amendments in Juvenile Justice Act, but in education. In women realising their self worth and men realising the importance of women from the get go.
  • If by banning the documentary, the government wants to prevent itself from being shown in a bad light then it is time for a self reflection and understanding that there is a problem that needs fixing. Living in a problem and shutting things from happening is not the answer. Calling India a free democracy is a blatant lie. Calling Delhi safe for women is furthest from the truth. Calling a girl child equal to a male child is laughable.

Monday, March 2, 2015

Life goes on


For quite some time, I used to wish that if/when I were to die, things would come to a standstill. Not in a time will stand still kind of metaphorical basis but in a people's lives will come to a grinding halt kind of basis. 

Yes that is selfish but isn't that what we are? We yarn to make a change in the world, on people around us - for better or for worse. And this is yet another selfish desire, last desire so to speak.

But I've come to the realisation that it doesn't happen. However much we want for it to happen - it doesn't. Yes people will shed bucketload amount of tears, there will be sadness, there will be that air of uncomfortableness but at the end of the day, it's just temporary. There will be the customs and traditions being followed and done with but after that, everyone goes home and sleeps it off.

I've tried to understand why is it that I want people's lives to stop; for their daily activities to be affected. And the answer, I think, is that everyone wants different things when it comes to 'end of life'. Some seek immortality, some a good life after death but I think I don't want either. I don't think my life, my work or my deeds will make any impact in the world and that is something everyone wants to do - atheist or religious. So, in a terribly absurd way, I hope people's lives are 'stopped' when I die. Now I understand the paradox that this is. How can someone stop living their lives when you've not made a dent in it? And that is a question I can't answer. Or can't figure out. Just yet.